Hoosier Army Mom’s Weblog

Conservative Views

Gates: More brigades to Afghanistan by Summer

 I got a call from my soldier this morning… he didn’t want me to be surprised, but he has been reassigned from being with the XVIII Airborne Corps (his original unit) to being assigned as an auxillary to the 82nd Airborne.  What this means is the chances are pretty high he will be deployed as part of the 20,000 troops.  I asked him long ago about what “parachute riggers” do when on deployment to Iraq or Afghanistan?  Convoy Security… they man the guns on trucks and armored vehicles.  I am as proud of him as I can be, but that is not to say I won’t be sending up some serious prayers along with sending out care packages when and if he deploys.  Time to prepare myself mentally for this one.  And my youngest son is talking Air Force… there really is never any comfort zone for a Mom. 

 

Gen. McKiernan sits in his office at ISAF headquarters in Kabul. "I don't like to use the word 'surge' here because if we put these additional forces in here, it's going to be for the next few years," he said. "It's not a temporary increase of combat strength."

Gen. McKiernan sits in his office at ISAF headquarters in Kabul. "I don't like to use the word 'surge' here because if we put these additional forces in here, it's going to be for the next few years," he said. "It's not a temporary increase of combat strength."

Commander sees ‘tough fight’ in Afghan war

 

By Tom Vanden Brook USATODAY

KABUL — The top commander of U.S. and NATO troops in Afghanistan said Sunday that 2009 will be a “tough fight” in Afghanistan and the United States will need nearly twice as many troops for up to four years to stabilize the country.

 

In an interview with USA TODAY at the International Security Assistance Force headquarters, Gen. David McKiernan said increasing U.S. troop levels from about 32,000 to 55,000 or 60,000 is “needed until we get to this tipping point where the Afghan army and the Afghan police have both the capacity and capability to provide security for their people.”  “That is at least three or four more years away,” he added.  The Afghan army has 78,000 troops and is building to 134,000.

McKiernan said he has asked the Pentagon for more than 20,000 soldiers, Marines and airmen. He also called on NATO nations to increase their commitment of troops to Afghanistan and to remove restrictions on how and when they can fight. There are about 31,000 troops from other nations in Afghanistan.

 

U.S. troop levels probably will need to remain at elevated levels for “several years at a minimum,” depending on the stability of the Afghan government, the training of its troops, and cooperation from tribal leaders and neighboring Pakistan, according to Andrew Krepinevich, president of the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments.

 

McKiernan said his request for more troops differs from the escalation in Iraq last year. The addition of more than 30,000 troops there, combined with a new strategy, helped improve security.

“I don’t like to use the word ‘surge’ here because if we put these additional forces in here, it’s going to be for the next few years,” he said. “It’s not a temporary increase of combat strength.”

McKiernan declined to say whether he expected next year to be more deadly for U.S. troops. Through October, 129 U.S. servicemembers were killed in Afghanistan this year, compared with 83 combat deaths in all of 2007.

 

He acknowledged the Pentagon’s ability to field more troops depends on reducing its forces in Iraq. There are 148,000 U.S. troops there. “There’s certainly a linkage,” he said. “The availability of the forces that we’ve asked for here — that’s directly connected to force flow in Iraq.”

 

Despite the challenges, McKiernan said he remained optimistic.

 

“I believe that over time, with the support of the international community, Afghan institutions will grow and develop and this insurgency will be contained and defeated,” he said. “I am firmly of the belief that the vast majority of the people in Afghanistan … don’t support the Taliban. They don’t support the other radical insurgent groups.”

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December 11, 2008 - Posted by | Commentaries, Government, In the News, Our Military | , , , , , ,

4 Comments »

  1. Bring him home Hoosiermom. We don’t want to hear that your heart is broken. Just get him to come home. Because unless they are willing to intimidate or kill relevant leadership in the Saud, Iranian, and Pakistani regimes this thing cannot be solved. Barry is probably wanting to expand this deal as a sideshow because it cannot hurt his sponsors. It won’t even stress their wallets. Because hiring Pashtuns for a few dollars a day is not a bank-breaking exercise for people with a great deal of oil money.

    If you think this post will be demoralizing you go right ahead and wipe it without a second thought. But now that Barry Hussein Obama is taking over maybe you ought to think about trying to get these guys to come home for four years or so.

    Then again he could be rolled by the electoral college in four days or so.

    Comment by graemebird | December 12, 2008

  2. I’m hoping for the 4 days or so option. What a trip. Naw, I am not thinking in terms of the military being a raw deal, it is the leadership or lack of from Washington that I worry about. I fully understand what you are saying. All I can do is pray.

    Comment by hoosierarmymom | December 12, 2008

  3. Dear Friend!
    Welcome to my “Blog”, with electronic adress URL: http://nikotev.wordpress.com/
    In the new variant of the blog there are very much new informers, themes, banners and analisys by the variouse problems of the military history and policy. They will be very interesting for you! In the world system of the cybersytes, the blog received a high mark “600,5″.
    Your friend Nikolay Kotev

    Comment by Nickolay Kotev | January 12, 2009

  4. Nickolay, I am pleased to see you comment here and share. I will indeed pay you a visit very soon mon ami. :-)

    Comment by hoosierarmymom | January 12, 2009


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