Hoosier Army Mom’s Weblog

Conservative Views

U.S. Marines launch major offensive in Afghanistan

This post is in support of our troops going in harm’s way in Afghanistan right now.  They are my heroes, and are on the top of my prayer list as they go forward to try to make a difference.

U.S. Marines launch major offensive in Afghanistan

From the article:

Officials described the offensive — dubbed Khanjar or “Strike of the Sword” — as the largest and fastest-moving of the war’s new phase and the biggest Marine offensive since the one in Fallujah, Iraq, in 2004. It involves nearly 4,000 newly arrived Marines plus 650 Afghan forces. British forces last week led similar, but smaller, missions to clear out insurgents in Helmand and neighboring Kandahar province.

“Where we go we will stay, and where we stay, we will hold, build and work toward transition of all security responsibilities to Afghan forces,” Marine Corps Brig. Gen. Larry Nicholson said in a statement.

You can read the entire news article by clicking on the title link above.

US-marines-in-Main-Poshte-001

U.S. Marines launch key operation in Afghanistan

By Peter Graff — Reuter’s UK reporter

SORKHDOZ, Afghanistan (Reuters) – Thousands of U.S. Marines stormed deep into Taliban territory in an Afghan valley on Thursday, marking the start of a major new effort by the Obama administration to regain the initiative in the war.

The Marines met little resistance on day one of Operation Khanjar, or Strike of the Sword, to seize almost all the lower Helmand River valley, heartland of the Taliban insurgency and the world’s biggest opium poppy producing region.

One U.S. Marine was killed and several others were wounded during the day, the Marines said in a statement, adding that they had not received any confirmed reports of civilian casualties or damage to property.

Article continues…

Other news from Afghanistan:

Taliban nabs US soldier in Afghanistan

However the offensive was overshadowed by news of what the military said is the first capture of an American soldier in Iraq or Afghanistan in two to three years.

“A US soldier who has been missing since June 30 from his assigned unit is believed to have been captured by militant forces,” said US military spokeswoman Captain Elizabeth Mathias. “We are using all of our available resources to find him and provide for his safe return.”

A commander of the Taliban’s Haqqani faction, named Bahram, said his militia had captured the soldier in Paktika province, along with three Afghan guards.

He said the soldier had been taken to “a safe place” and demands would likely be made for his release.

“Our leaders have not decided on the fate of this soldier. They will decide on his fate and soon we will present video tapes of the coalition soldier and our demand to media,” he said.

The US military has described the al-Qa’ida-linked Haqqani network as one of the “most lethal Taliban organisations”.

The missing soldier was captured outside his base and was not part of the new US-led operation, in which about 4000 US marines and 650 Afghan troops mobilised yesterday with orders to clear the southern region of militants and restore government services.

The entire news article can be accessed by clicking on the title link above.

All who love America and our troops, please remember these brave men and women who are fighting, pray for the families of the fallen and wounded, and pray that the soldier being held captive, is safely released.  We cannot love and support our military enough right now.

July 3, 2009 Posted by | Commentaries, In the News, Our Military | , , , | 6 Comments

Gates: More brigades to Afghanistan by Summer

 I got a call from my soldier this morning… he didn’t want me to be surprised, but he has been reassigned from being with the XVIII Airborne Corps (his original unit) to being assigned as an auxillary to the 82nd Airborne.  What this means is the chances are pretty high he will be deployed as part of the 20,000 troops.  I asked him long ago about what “parachute riggers” do when on deployment to Iraq or Afghanistan?  Convoy Security… they man the guns on trucks and armored vehicles.  I am as proud of him as I can be, but that is not to say I won’t be sending up some serious prayers along with sending out care packages when and if he deploys.  Time to prepare myself mentally for this one.  And my youngest son is talking Air Force… there really is never any comfort zone for a Mom. 

 

Gen. McKiernan sits in his office at ISAF headquarters in Kabul. "I don't like to use the word 'surge' here because if we put these additional forces in here, it's going to be for the next few years," he said. "It's not a temporary increase of combat strength."

Gen. McKiernan sits in his office at ISAF headquarters in Kabul. "I don't like to use the word 'surge' here because if we put these additional forces in here, it's going to be for the next few years," he said. "It's not a temporary increase of combat strength."

Commander sees ‘tough fight’ in Afghan war

 

By Tom Vanden Brook USATODAY

KABUL — The top commander of U.S. and NATO troops in Afghanistan said Sunday that 2009 will be a “tough fight” in Afghanistan and the United States will need nearly twice as many troops for up to four years to stabilize the country.

 

In an interview with USA TODAY at the International Security Assistance Force headquarters, Gen. David McKiernan said increasing U.S. troop levels from about 32,000 to 55,000 or 60,000 is “needed until we get to this tipping point where the Afghan army and the Afghan police have both the capacity and capability to provide security for their people.”  “That is at least three or four more years away,” he added.  The Afghan army has 78,000 troops and is building to 134,000.

McKiernan said he has asked the Pentagon for more than 20,000 soldiers, Marines and airmen. He also called on NATO nations to increase their commitment of troops to Afghanistan and to remove restrictions on how and when they can fight. There are about 31,000 troops from other nations in Afghanistan.

 

U.S. troop levels probably will need to remain at elevated levels for “several years at a minimum,” depending on the stability of the Afghan government, the training of its troops, and cooperation from tribal leaders and neighboring Pakistan, according to Andrew Krepinevich, president of the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments.

 

McKiernan said his request for more troops differs from the escalation in Iraq last year. The addition of more than 30,000 troops there, combined with a new strategy, helped improve security.

“I don’t like to use the word ‘surge’ here because if we put these additional forces in here, it’s going to be for the next few years,” he said. “It’s not a temporary increase of combat strength.”

McKiernan declined to say whether he expected next year to be more deadly for U.S. troops. Through October, 129 U.S. servicemembers were killed in Afghanistan this year, compared with 83 combat deaths in all of 2007.

 

He acknowledged the Pentagon’s ability to field more troops depends on reducing its forces in Iraq. There are 148,000 U.S. troops there. “There’s certainly a linkage,” he said. “The availability of the forces that we’ve asked for here — that’s directly connected to force flow in Iraq.”

 

Despite the challenges, McKiernan said he remained optimistic.

 

“I believe that over time, with the support of the international community, Afghan institutions will grow and develop and this insurgency will be contained and defeated,” he said. “I am firmly of the belief that the vast majority of the people in Afghanistan … don’t support the Taliban. They don’t support the other radical insurgent groups.”

December 11, 2008 Posted by | Commentaries, Government, In the News, Our Military | , , , , , , | 4 Comments